Research Reports

Fullness of Life Together: Reimagining Christian engagement in our communities

Thousands of churches around the country are working to support people in their communities, providing activities ranging from food banks and debt advice, to night shelters and job clubs. Together with Livability we reflect on the way in which churches engage with our communities; we ask questions about the dominance of service delivery models in Christian community engagement and offer alternatives drawing on Co-production and Asset-based Community development.

Using case studies from around the country, theological reflection and questions for discussion we invite Christians seeking to impact their communities to reflect with us on how we might do this in ways that build community and result in life in all its fullness, shared together. 

Click here for the Executive Summary.

Click here to read the full report.

 

Tell me your story: Starting conversations about poverty in England

In this report we share three stories that show how complex life can be for ordinary people on a low income - the challenging situations they face and the hard decisions that need to be taken in difficult financial circumstances.

It is our hope that these stories will start conversations about poverty; conversations that will deepen our understanding, help us to better know and care for our neighbours, and so enable us, together, to build flourishing communities.


 

 

Church in Action: A national survey of church-based social action

Social action is not an optional side project for the Church; it is core to its heart and mission. The commitment to this calling can be clearly seen in the sheer scale and diversity of activities offered by local churches, ranging from food banks and debt advice, to lunch clubs and fitness classes. 

By sharing the results of a large-scale national survey, assessing the scale and nature of Anglican social action in England, this report highlights and celebrates the contribution that churches are making to their local communities. 

Click here for the Executive Summary.

Click here to read the full report.

 

 

Events

A Glass Half Full: Exploring Strength-Based approaches to Community Development

In November 2015, CUF and Edinburgh University’s Divinity School hosted an event on the theme of community development, the fourth in a series funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This paper is a summary of the presentations delivered at the event and has been written in order to share the learning and hopefully, to encourage similar discussions around the country.

 

 

 

Money Talks: How can we tackle financial exclusion?

In September 2015, CUF and Edinburgh University’s Divinity School hosted an event on the theme of financial exclusion, the third in a series funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This paper is a summary of the presentations delivered in the third event of the series and has been written in order to share the learning and to encourage similar discussions around the country.

 

 

 

 

A Silent Epidemic: How can we share one another's loneliness?

In July 2015, CUF and Edinburgh University’s Divinity School hosted an event on the theme of loneliness, the second in a series funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This paper is a summary of the presentations delivered during the event.

 

 

 

 

Growing Stronger Together: How can we build flourishing communities?

In July 2015, CUF and Edinburgh University’s Divinity School hosted an event on the theme of flourishing communities, the first in a series funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This paper is a summary of the presentations delivered during the event.

You can listen to the talk given by Maurice Glasman here

 

 

Homelessness: are we really helping?

Together Middlesbrough and Cleveland, a joint venture between CUF and the Diocese of York, recently hosted an event on the theme of homelessness.

Gathering together a large group of practitioners from local homelessness agencies, faith-based charities and the local authority, the day was a chance to reflect on how these agencies could work together to more effectively transform the lives of the homeless. This paper is a brief summary of the talks and discussions that took place throughout the day.